Pepys himself

by Cecil Stuart Emden

Publisher: Greenwood Press in Westport, Conn

Written in English
Published: Pages: 146 Downloads: 537
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Places:

  • Great Britain

Subjects:

  • Pepys, Samuel, 1633-1703 -- Psychology.,
  • Cabinet officers -- Great Britain -- Biography.,
  • Diaries -- Authorship -- Psychological aspects.

Edition Notes

StatementCecil S. Emden.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDA447.P4 E45 1980
The Physical Object
Paginationxi, 146 p. ;
Number of Pages146
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4102633M
ISBN 100313226075
LC Control Number80017177

  Samuel Pepys is as much a paragon of literature as Chaucer and Shakespeare. His Diary is one of the principal sources for many aspects of the history of its period. In spite of its significance, all previous editions were inadequately edited and suffered from a number of omissions—until Robert Latham and William Matthews went back to the year-old original manuscript and deciphered each 1/5(1). Shortly before the present correspondence, having been greatly impressed by Bryant's book on Charles II, the historian G. M. Trevelyan had passed over to him the extensive notes and papers of the Pepys scholar J. R. Tanner (), to assist him in writing his Pepys biography. Plenty of tidbits from those diaries make their way into this thorough, richly detailed portrait by English writer Tomalin (Jane Austen: A Life, , etc.): on one page we find Pepys (–) chasing after a servant girl and castigating himself for his success, on another recording a moment of sexual pleasure with which he graced his long Author: Claire Tomalin.   One of the most popular books of Pepys’s own youth was the Eikon Basilike, a series of devotional letters and texts that were printed, billed and sold as having been written by Charles I before his execution. Historians doubt Charles is the true author—but under Cromwell’s protectorate the book sold like hot cakes.

She is the author of Reading Fictions, Deception in English Literary and Political Culture and of Samuel Pepys and His Books: Reading, Newsgathering, and Sociability, Her other publications include articles on book history, eighteenth-century novels, and the introduction of /5(). The Diary of Samuel Pepys is one of the most entertaining documents in English history. Written between and , as Pepys was establishing himself as a key administrator in the naval office, it is an intimate portrait of life in seventeenth-century England. Pepys’ diary covers his professional and personal activities, including, famously, his love of music, theater, food, wine, and his.

Pepys himself by Cecil Stuart Emden Download PDF EPUB FB2

"Samuel Pepys: The Unequalled Self" is full biography - a biography that uses a six volume diary (that covers a 10 year period of his life) as a primary source. To read just the diary is to understand the yearsbut by reading Tomalin's work we are able to understand Pepys and his country's entire by: The book’s title “The unequalled self” is the subtitle of an essay by Robert Louis Stevenson who applauded Pepys’ "unflinching sincerity" in the amount of self-disclosure in his diary.

Read more/5(). Read this rather interesting book comprised of the diary entries of one Mr. Samuel Pepys. In and of itself, the diary is not altogether engaging. It is however quite interesting for its descriptions of the Great Fire ofwhich burned down much of London.4/5.

How Samuel Pepys nearly lost his head. including an analysis of the strength of the English Navy which Pepys himself had written. But this is not just a book for Pepys. In Pepys built a second-storey extension on his house in Seething Lane and in re-ordering his upstairs rooms, created private closets for himself and Elizabeth.

The book examines how closets were used at the time Pepys himself book their wider social significance as a means of displaying status, personal taste and intellectual prestige. New book The Dark Side of Samuel Pepys: Society's First Sex Offender released Text shows how the famed writer used his power to assault multiple women The 17th Century diarist documented his own.

Six days later Pepys saw for himself for the first time the effects of the plague while strolling through Drury Lane, writing in his diary that evening ‘two or three houses marked with a red cross upon the doors, and “Lord have mercy upon us!” writ there; which was a sad sight to me’.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Several of the portraits have been engraved, but the most interesting of these are those used by Pepys himself as book-plates.

These were both engraved by Robert White, and taken from paintings by Kneller. The church of St. Olave, Hart Street, is intimately associated with Pepys both in his life and in his death, and for many years the question. A life laid bare Pepys's diary is our principal source of information about 17th-century London.

But what makes it endlessly fascinating, says Claire Tomalin, is the author's candour about his Author: Claire Tomalin. The book tells the story of Samuel Pepys who is famous for writing a detailed diary of his life and the events that surrounded him during the s. He came from humbles beginnings to being the secretary of the admiralty/5.

diary of samuel pepys Download diary of samuel pepys or read online books in PDF, EPUB, Tuebl, and Mobi Format.

Click Download or Read Online button to get diary of samuel pepys book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want. A few references to Pepys’s books appear in the eighteenth century, and we even know that the Diary was looked at, though of course not fully explored or transcribed.

More important, we have the record of a German visitor to Magdalene in the mid-years of the century who. Friday 8 September Waked, and fell in talk with my wife about the letter, and she satisfied me that she did not know from whence it come, but believed it might be from her cozen Franke Moore lately come out of France.

The truth is the thing I think cannot have much in it, and being unwilling (being in other things so much at ease) to vex myself in a strange place at a melancholy time. So, besides reporting on Pepys's crude and predatory amorous adventures, much of the book is devoted to Pepys's hard work over many years as a naval administrator.

He devoted himself to modernizing the Navy by both the introduction of proper record keeping and by using the resultant statistical data to develop a more efficient procurement by: The Diary of Samuel Pepys is one of the most entertaining documents in English history.

Written between andas Pepys was establishing himself as a key administrator in the naval office, it is an intimate portrait of life in seventeenth-century England, covering his professional and personal activities, including, famously, his love of music, theatre, food, and wine and his peccadilloes.

Samuel Pepys kept a diary in which he wrote with astonishing candour about the life he saw around him in London in the s, and about his private desires and ambitions.

The diary was kept for fewer than 10 years of his long life: Claire Tomalin tells the whole story of the Fleet Street tailor's son who made himself rich and powerful, an MP and adviser to : Claire Tomalin.

While critical of the King's and the Court's incessant "gambling and whoring", Pepys himself was no paragon of virtue. His dalliances with maidservants and accommodating ladies of his acquaintance caused bitter quarrels with his wife.

He seems to have lusted after every pretty girl who crossed his path. Repeated vows to mend his ways generally /5(). Samuel Pepys was a man of somewhat humble beginning (his father had been a tailor), but he also had family in the British government, and family that had gone to Cambridge (Pepys himself graduated from Cambridge) and these connections and this education provided him an entry into the Admiralty where Pepys spent much of his working life.

Samuel Pepys, (born FebruLondon, England—diedLondon), English diarist and naval administrator, celebrated for his Diary (first published in ), which gives a fascinating picture of the official and upper-class life of Restoration London from Jan.

1,to Life. Pepys was the son of a working tailor who had come to London from Huntingdonshire. Pepys’s determination to place himself – in all his contradictory and intoxicating vigour – at the centre of his own life, with its splendour, shame, variety and vanity, had taken over.

Samuel Pepys is as much a paragon of literature as Chaucer and Shakespeare. His Diary is one of the principal sources for many aspects of the history of its period.

In spite of its significance, all previous editions were inadequately edited and suffered from a number of omissions--until Robert Latham and William Matthews went back to the year-old original manuscript and deciphered each.

Pepys, as Tomalin points out, was hardly the first person to write a diary, but most earlier diaries were written for a specific purpose -- usually religious (as an aid to spiritual bookkeeping. Samuel Pepys - Samuel Pepys - Naval administration.: It was not in Pepys’s nature to do things by halves.

Having resolved to do his duty, he set out to equip himself for its performance. In the summer of he occupied his leisure moments by learning the multiplication table, listening to lectures on shipbuilding, and studying the prices of naval stores: “into Thames Street, beyond the.

This book is essential for anyone with an interest in the Royal Navy, the Civil War and Restoration period, and indeed Pepys himself. Indeed, this book truly deserves the Samuel Pepys award it has won.

Truly superb. Steve Earles, Destructive MusicPrice: £   I first encountered the diary of Samuel Pepys inwhen I was It is the book that has informed – I might almost say "defined" – my whole life.

Because of it, since 1 January I. The Diary of Samuel Pepys is one of the most entertaining documents in English history. Written between andas Pepys was establishing himself as a key administrator in the naval office, it is an intimate portrait of life in 17th-century England covering his professional and personal activities, including, famously, his love of music, theatre, food, wine and his peccadilloes.

Samuel Pepys achieved fame as a naval administrator, a friend and colleague of the powerful and learned, a figure of substance. But for nearly ten years he kept a private diary in which he recorded, with unparalleled openness and sensitivity to the turbulent world around him, exactly what it was like to be a young man in Restoration London.

This diary lies at the heart of Claire Tomalin's /5(26). Hewing to a more traditional interpretation of Pepys that sees him as a man of the late, late Renaissance, content to exist in wonder and curiosity, his editor Richard La Gallienne claimed that for Pepys’s “It is not so much himself that interests him, more merely the things that happen to himself, but the people about him and the things.

It is a pleasure to be able, after a suitable time period – aided by ”increasing maturity” - to reread Pepys, and the researcher and indeed, Pepys official librarian, Robert Latham presents an admirable selection of edited extracts in this, the illustrated, version of the main diaries of to As the editor remarks, it is a great pity that Samuel never resumed his daily journals /5(5).

Pepys, who at that time was a young clerk, was on board one of the ships by virtue of his family links to Edward Montagu who commanded the fleet sent to bring Charles home.

Pepys fired one of the guns himself, but leaned too far over, and the flash from the touchhole hurt his right eye. All day the guns fired; England had a king : ABRAMS (Ignition). Journey to the seventeenth century and a dramatic period of political upheaval, plague, and fire, with this “vivid portrait of Restoration England” (History Today).Inside Pepys’ London reveals a vivid picture of London at a critical point in history, as it was poised to become a major center of international commerce and provides accounts of all aspects of contemporary life Brand: David & Charles.Samuel Pepys was a great collector of books, news, and gossip.

This study uses his surviving papers to examine reading practices, collecting, and the exchange of information in the late seventeenth century. Offering the first extensive history of reading during the Restoration, it traces developments in the book trade and news transmission at a time when England was the scene of dramatic.